Profits Are Good

When I got to college I was surprised at how much disdain capitalism and the bourgeoisie were held in.  I was a small town unsophisticated kid.  To me, a law abiding person who served the wants of fellow people and supported a family seemed good. The way life was ordered, with shopkeepers, tradesmen, doctors, clerks, was not only familiar but correct.

Professors didn’t agree with me. In fact, it was implied that my thinking was shallow. The bourgeoisie were exploitative, secretly dishonest, depraved, and above all boring.  The artist, the academic and the world historical individual were the ones who deserved respect. Don’t think too much about the trail of blood left by the world historical individual.

Anyway it is a story for another time how I came to decide that capitalism is good. I have decided to start a blog defending capitalism. To defend capitalism one has to defend profits.  For under capitalism no business exists and grows unless it is profitable.

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Uber is Revealing

Uber is revealing how government is generally a supporter of entrenched interests.  Upstarts and competitors are always hated by existing businesses. Under real capitalism there is little an existing business can do other than produce a better good or service at a lower price.  When the government has unlimited powers to regulate business however the more powerful existing business can wield the police power of the State to throttle competitors.

Here’s an example from the news: Counsel meeting could limit the number of Uber cars.  The stated public purpose is to fight congestion. That reasoning ignores the benefit to people. Of course adding Uber cars to the surface streets of Manhattan increases congestion. It also makes it possible for people to get around conveniently without bringing their own car.  Huge parts of Manhattan have no cabs cruising most hours because there is not enough demand. Calling a radio dispatched limo can involve an hour wait. Competition for yellow cabs will make service better. Just the entry of Uber often makes the local cabs cleaner, the local drivers more pleasant and the cars upkeep better.

The taxi industry proposed similar legislation before. Where are the people who commute to Manhattan by car and bus? Are they calling for this type of legislation?  How about pedestrians and businesses? Are there concerned committees with broad support?

Thousands of people want to work by providing a service to Manhattan. More thousands want to voluntary exchange their money for an Uber ride. Yet the city counsel wants to prevent this voluntary exchange.